Wanted: a Transdisciplinary Knowledge Domain for Urban Health

By Roderick J. Lawrence & Franz W. Gatzweiler

Abstract The current disconnection between access to increasing amounts of data about urbanization, health, and other global changes and the conflicting meanings and values of that data has created uncertainty and reduced the ability of people to act upon available
information which they do not necessarily understand.

We see a disconnection between increasing data availability and data processing capability and capacity. In response to this connection, modeling has been attributed an important role in international and national research programs in order to predict the future based on
past and recent trends. Predictive models are often data heavy and founded on assumptions which are difficult to verify, especially regarding urban health issues in specific contexts.

read more

Transformative Knowledge for an era of Planetary Urbanization? Questioning the role of social sciences and humanities from an interdisciplinary perspective

Position Paper Prepared by Simone Tulumello, Andy Inch and Olivia Bina (ICS-ULisboa)

A few decades ago, Henri Lefebvre (1970) prophesied that human society, under capitalist organisation, would inevitably become entirely urbanised. If, as many argue, that moment has arrived and we live an age of ‘planetary urbanisation’ (Brenner, 2013; Buckley and Strauss, 2016), the problem(s) of the urban – the ‘urban question’ (Castells, 1972; Merrifield, 2014) – are amongst the central challenges facing the world. From a different perspective, the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’, has popularised the idea that mankind has become a planetary force (Crutzen and Stoermer, 2000). Given its dominant urban form, the Anthropocene’s sustainability becomes increasingly a matter of urban sustainability, and that is a major 21st century challenge. The New Urban Agenda by UN-Habitat (2016) summarises the main obstacles to sustainable urban development as: ‘the persistence of multiple forms of poverty, growing inequalities, and environmental degradation […], with social and economic exclusion and spatial segregation often an irrefutable reality in cities and human settlements’.

read more

Reflecting on Collaborative Research Into the Sustainability of Mediterranean Agriculture: A Case Study Using a Systematization of Experiences Approach

Main Contributors: Maria Helena Guimarães, Cecilia Fonseca, Carla Gonzalez and Teresa Pinto Correia

This article describes how a research institute went about reviewing the relationship between its members and external research partners in engaging in collaborative research. A systematization of experiences (SE) process was implemented to enable such review and draw implications for the institute’s strategy regarding research into the sustainability of Mediterranean agriculture.

read more

Inter and Trans-disciplinarity: Implications for European research programming and universities

By Olivia Bina

PDF Presentation used at the ICS-Ulisboa III Fórum ICS, 5 June 2017

read more

Creative Small Settlements Culture-based solutions for Local Sustainable Development

Editors: Giulio Verdini & Paolo Ceccarelli

Main Contributors: Karina Borja, Paola Ferrari, Françoise Ged, Pilar Maria Guerrieri, Alain Marinos, Maria da Graça Moreira, Etra Connie Occhialini, Min Zhang, Li Zhen.

This research report aims to show ways to understand culture and creativity in small settlements, by collecting a series of international case studies that form the backbone of the chapter 10 of the UNESCO Global Report on urban-rural linkages and titled ‘Culture as a tool to achieve harmonious territorial development’. This can allow a wider dissemination of the theoretical underpinnings and the comparative findings of a research conducted during 2015 and 2016 by several research units all over the world.

read more

The value of co-design /co-production as a methodology for promoting sustainable and just cities

By David Simon

“There are diverse approaches to transdisciplinary co-production/co-design/co-creation, which all share the key features of deep and extended participation.”

(Article based on the INTREPID Winter School training session on 16th Feb 2017)

read more

Enseigner l'interdisciplinarité: défis et réponses

R. Lawrence (2016). Enseigner l’interdisciplinarité : défis et réponses. IN: “Interdisciplinarités entre Natures et Sociétés” (B. Hubert et N. Mathieu [Dir], 2016, éditions  Peter Lang, pp.241-252).

Les problématiques environnementales auxquelles sont actuellement confrontées les sociétés ont pour caractéristique principale leur complexité. Cette complexité est inhérente à des enjeux qui dépassent désormais les frontières géographiques et disciplinaires. Une réforme majeure de l’instruction publique, de l’école primaire au cursus post-obligatoire, est indispensable pour remettre en question notre apprentissage de l’analyse et de la compréhension de ces phénomènes. Aujourd’hui, si la plupart des sujets relatifs aux problématiques environnementales sont structurés dans le cadre des limites disciplinaires et professionnelles conventionnelles, envisager des contributions interdisciplinaires et transdisciplinaires, plutôt que des contributions disciplinaires et multidisciplinaires, permettrait
d’appréhender la complexité des problématiques environnementales et pourrait servir de base à des recherches et à des pratiques professionnelles innovatrices.

read more

Interdisciplinarity in action: philosophy of science perspectives

by Uskali Mäki and Miles MacLeod

The present collection of studies aspires to promote this line of philosophical inquiry in terms of case studies on various aspects of interdisciplinarity in science, and to bring philosophical concepts and principles to bear in its analysis. While much current philosophical work has focused on the possibility of conceptual and methodological unification and integration amongst specific fields, we aim to widen the scope of philosophical treatment of this issue by mapping out the broader landscape of philosophical issues that emerge from interdisciplinary interactions, and by identifying the points where philosophical analysis can make important and relevant contributions. The guiding observations and principles in this endeavour include the following.

read more

LERU’s Interim Evaluation of Horizon 2020

By LEAGUE OF EUROPEAN RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES (LERU)

This paper is LERU’s contribution to the Horizon 2020 Interim Evaluation. It is structured according to what is expected to be the structure of the Terms of Reference for the Interim Evaluation. The paper focuses very much on Horizon 2020 itself. LERU will publish a paper on the future, the next framework programme for research and innovation, in the first quarter of 2017

read more

Interdisciplinarity: how universities unlock its power to innovate, League of European Research Universities (LERU)

By Wernli, D. and Darbellay, F. (2016)
Modern universities were invented in Europe in the 18th century with an emphasis on research, the provision of high level education to each student, the unity between research and teaching, equality in status for each discipline, and academic freedom. This system led to remarkable scientific, technical, cultural, and societal progress.
read more

HABITAT III messages to the INTREPID process

In October 2016 the capital city of Ecuador, Quito, hosted the United Nations HABITAT III Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development. Attended by about 45,000 people from 167 countries, the conference brought together high-level politicians, mayors, representatives of local and regional authorities, civil society and community groups, the private sector and urban planners. Thus in a city of 2.5 million inhabitants, at 2850 m above the sea level, they made together a next step on a 40-years-long path (from Vancouver in 1976 and via Istanbul in 1996) towards a common understanding on needed global action to guarantee sustainable urban future for all. Habitat III is estimated to have had the strongest participation of civil society, stakeholders, and local authorities in the history of UN conferences. The New Urban Agenda adopted at the conference confirmed a worldwide commitment to a sustainable urban future thus posing an huge challenge for undertaking effective action at all levels.

Three main messages among the impressive variety of topics discussed and voices heard at the conference could be considered particularly important to INTREPID process:

read more

Transdisciplinarity is key to sustainable urban futures: David Simon and Susan Parnell

Both members of INTREPID’s International Advisory Board are co-authors in McPhearson et al (2016) Scientists must have a say in the future of cities, Nature, 538, 165-6

“Support transdisciplinary research and synthesis. Communities with relevant knowledge must guide urban-development policy over the short and long term. Transdisciplinary research must be supported through new sources of urban science funding and organizations. Existing knowledge should be synthesized and fed into policymaking at all levels.”

read more

The use of academic research in planning practice: who, what, where, when and how?

By: Dominic Stead

The use of academic evidence in policymaking is certainly not a new issue – it has been a subject of enquiry for at least several decades. More recent is a trend of greater involvement of policy users in academic research, often based on underlying ideas that this will raise the quality of research, increase the influence of research on policymaking and/or improve the effectiveness of policymaking. Indeed, involving policy users in academic research to promote the co-creation of knowledge is an increasingly encountered requirement of research funding agencies across the world. This requirement not only places new demands and expectations on academics and policymaking professionals in the research process, it also adds to the importance of understanding the utilisation of academic research in practice.

 

read more

Interdisciplinary Science: A Coming of Age?

By: Roderick J. Lawrence

The New York Academy of Sciences Magazine

Large global challenges, such as climate change, require a comprehensive approach, part of which should be interdisciplinary research.

Interdisciplinarity is a word à la mode, as shown by the contributions in Nature‘s special issue on the topic (September 2015). However, the collection of articles and the statistics they present confirm that interdisciplinary science is still not mainstream: it is still rarely supported by funders of scientific research despite the increasing number of calls for interdisciplinary projects, it is still rarely taught in higher education curricula, and it is still not recognized by many academic institutions. Indeed interdisciplinary research is considered by many to be contradictory to the basic principles of the production of scientific knowledge.

read more

New Book: Ways of Residing in Transformation Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Edited by Sten Gromark, Mervi Ilmonen, Katrin Paadam and Eli Støa

book_waysresidingtransformationProfound transformations in residential practices are emerging in Europe as well as throughout the urban world. They can be observed in the unfolding diversity of residential architecture and spatially restructured cities. The complexity of urban and societal processes behind these changes requires new research approaches in order to fully grasp the significant changes in citizens’ lifestyles, their residential preferences, capacities and future opportunities for implementing resilient residential practices. The international case studies in this book examine why ways of residing have changed as well as the meaning and the significance of the social, economic, political, cultural and symbolic contexts. The volume brings together an interdisciplinary range of perspectives to reflect specifically upon the dynamic exchange between evolving ways of residing and professional practices in the fields of architecture and design, planning, policy-making, facilities management, property and market. In doing so, it provides a resourceful basis for further inquiries seeking an understanding of ways of residing in transformation as a reflection of diversifying residential cultures.
This book will offer insights of interest to academics, policy-makers and professionals as well as students of urban studies, sociology, architecture, housing, planning, business and economics, engineering and facilities management.

read more

Imagine shaping your future

Author: Olivia Bina

An inquiry into how art and science can at times disagree about our future, and why it matters

Science and research agendas are an exercise in future thinking. They help to shape futures by planning to create the knowledge that will bring about desired change and transformation. For this reason, research policy, matters.

read more

Upload your Publication.

Publications
Drop a file here or click to upload Choose File
Maximum upload size: 67.11MB
Sending

Thanks for sharing!

Search